Joseph Lovett, Director/Executive Producer

Joseph Lovett is an award-winning filmmaker, whose films have informed, engaged and inspired people into action. His work on Gay and AIDS issues has filled a particular gap in public awareness. Joe’s groundbreaking “Parents of Gays” for CBS in 1977 was the first positive portrayal of gay people ever presented on network television.

IN the early 80′s, at ABC’s 20/20 Joe tirelessly pushed for permission to cover the AIDS epidemic which was terrorizing his friends and neighbors. His coverage through the 80′s included the first investigation into the government’s slow response to the crisis as well as stories on AIDS in the blood supply, ACT UP, desperate measures for treatment, heterosexual AIDS and more. He was the only news person to cover Americans going to Paris for experimental treatment when Rock Hudson announced he had AIDS and was being treated there.

After working at ABC News 20/20 for ten years as director/producer, Joe founded Lovett Productions in 1989. From 1992 through 1996 Joe produced “In A New Light,” prime time AIDS education and entertainment specials, with an awareness campaign that flooded the CDC’s AIDS hotline with an unprecedented number of calls. Introduced by Elizabeth Taylor, Rosie Perez, and Barbara Walters, the specials wove performances from Barry Manilow, Elton John, Melissa Etheridge, Liza Minnelli and others with stories of how people were coping with AIDS in different ways across the country and around the world.

In 2003, he produced “State of Denial”, a film on the AIDS crisis in South Africa, which premiered at the Sundance Festival.

“Gay Sex in the 70s” premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2005 to sell out audiences. It was released theatrically in over 25 cities, shown in festivals and universities and broadcast all over the world. In the US, it aired on the Sundance Channel in 2007.

Over the years, Joe has been honored with numerous awards from advocacy organizations, including the AIDS Leadership Award.

M. Sean Kaminsky, Producer

Sean Kaminsky is an award-winning filmmaker whose work has tackled a broad range of topics – from social to political. His work generates empathy for his subjects while telling stories that engage and entertain.

For ThinkFilm! he directed Gifted & Challenged: the Making of Shortbus a daring documentary that followed the making of John Cameron Mitchell’s controversial hit film. He created the Sundance Channel short series Save the Slogan a lighthearted animated series that reveals the history behind environmental slogans turned cliché such as “Hug a Tree” as part of Redford’s Green launch on the network. Sean also directed several segments of MTV/LOGO’S hit TV show Be Real, as well as for the PBS series In the Life and is producing Dream of the Audience a New York State Council for the Arts funded indie documentary on avant-garde artist Theresa Cha directed by Woo Cho.

Sean is a published author of two books: Naked Lens which teaches readers to use video blogging for self-exploration (included in New York Institute for Photography curriculum) and Shoot 3D Video Like a Pro (included in Florida State University curriculum).

He is proud to have produced the award-winning indie documentary Gay Sex in the 70s with director Joe Lovett. The film broke box office records in its twenty-five city self-distributed nationwide screening and continues to garner acclaim. His current directing project is Open Sesame – The Story of Seeds, a feature-length documentary that reveals the serious risks that face one of our most overlooked natural resources: Seeds.